Ghostwriter talks creative writing

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A professional ghostwriter talks creative writing.

Don’t have the time to sit down and write this weekend? The work week got you down?

I contend that a lack of time is not the biggest obstacle to the creative temperament. The biggest obstacle is not properly feeding that imaginative urge.

Here are three things you can do that will keep the creative muscles flexed while you’re unable to write.

Ghostwriter Talks Creative Writing Tip 1: Play Hypothetical Games:

ghostwriter talks creative writing

I love this game. I call it, “What If?” I’ve been playing it since I was a teenager. Sit down in a crowded space. A cafe. An airport. A theater. Watch any person or group and create a little story about them.

What if those two are breaking up?

What if he’s just returning from a clandestine spy mission in Morocco?

What if they wrote the play?

The possibilities in this game are bounded only by your imagination. Flex those muscles. If you have to go to work or do errands instead of writing, stretch out a bit and push your boundaries.

 

Ghostwriter Talks Creative Writing Tip 2: Scenario Building

This exercise goes a bit further than the previous one. Create outlandish scenarios in everyday situations. This is an especially fun game to play with youngsters in tow.

What if the trunk of that car is full of clowns?

What if she has a parrot stashed under her jacket that’s telling her what to say?

What if that ice cream truck driver is actually an associate of James Bond? (Or Gru from Despicable Me if you’re playing with kids).

Sounds silly? It sounds silly because it is silly and that is OK.

We should never forget that, as writers, our core function is a type of play. We make up stories. And who does that better than a child at play? Watch your kid create an elaborate story line with just a toy truck at his disposal. Be like that. Be childlike.

Ghostwriter Talks Creative Writing Tip 3: Push Your Comfort Level On Judgement:

This may be difficult to stomach, but I believe a critical aspect of becoming a good writer is pushing your comfort level when it comes to judgments. You need to go a step beyond what is is easy for most.

I honed this ability over fifteen years in social work. Sometimes the scenario I encountered in the office forced me to be a tad judgmental. I had to simply say out loud, “that is not a nice person”.

I don’t think you should do it all the time and certainly not regarding people that you care about. But the rich array of characters in your story will include unseemly sorts. How best do you do that?

Be bold in your observations.

A writer needs to create realistic characters. People are disagreeable, devious and often unreliable… among a trove of other nasty traits. I don’t advocate cruelty or unfairness but when you’re crafting realistic characters, you may need to get to a level of judgment that feels uncomfortable.

That place beyond comfort is precisely what you’re looking seeking. Without it, fiction is flat.

Need more tips? Still feeling stuck? Give me a call. Together we can work out a strategy to get you back on track.

Erick MertzGhostwriter talks creative writing

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