How to edit your manuscript

How to edit your manuscript

Or not?

Recently, I wrote a post cautioning authors against the temptation to self edit your manuscript.

Although I stand by the idea that self-editing cannot replace the well executed professional development and content edit phase, I do think that the process plays an important role in the development of a successful manuscript. While you cannot fully develop a manuscript alone, you’re also working uphill if you choose to send material in without giving it your own critical read. Development is a matter of balance.

Here are a few tips on how you can self edit your manuscript to your best advantage.

Be Wise With Time:

This advice applies to every stage of the writing process, but none more so than here. A writer has to be wise with how they use their time. You need to make time to write. You also need time away from writing.

There is an important balance at play.

If your plan is to self edit your manuscript then take time away from it. Don’t edit a chapter the day after writing it. Don’t edit it a week after. Instead, allow the work time to breathe. Stand a step back.

Then when you’re ready, jump back in and make changes.

(Don’t) Be Hard On Your Work:

What I’m trying to get at is a measure of honesty. Be honest about the work. If your gut says it works, don’t overthink it and vice-versa. Trust your gut. If it doesn’t work on the page it’s likely time to make changes.

Again, it’s all about balance. Seems like we keep coming back to that theme.

If It’s Broken (Don’t) Try And Fix It:

This can be tricky for anyone. Creative people are born problem solvers.

The hope is that a proper self-edit will lead to the identification of problems. What do you do when you find a glaring plot hole in the story?

You fix it, of course. Get in there and get it done…

Not so fast though. Being hasty can aggravate a manuscript’s underlying problems. A quick fix is often just that. A gimmick. When your reader sits down with the book, they’ll be able to see a patch job.

Just because you identify the problem doesn’t mean you see the solution. These two are not necessarily linked items. Sometimes the solution takes a substantial amount of time to develop.

Give yourself that time. It’s worth it.

And when you’re ready, get in touch. You’ll be relieved that you followed all the right steps ahead of time.

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Erick Mertz is a Portland, Oregon based freelance writer. He works as an assignment ghostwriter for clients in fiction, non-fiction and screenwriting. He lives in Woodstock with his wife, Lisa, his dog Boris and two cats.

Erick MertzHow to edit your manuscript

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