Professional Ghostwriter – Ghostwriting As Path to Publication (Part I)

Ghostwriting can be an effective way to learn how to make craft into a business. As a long time professional ghostwriter, the best practices I have developed have gone a long way to prepare me for more success in where my ambitions lie.

Here are a few handy tips on how you can parlay a successful ghostwriting practice into a better platform for your own publication:

Clear Client Communication:

Writing is a solitary pursuit. Yet it is an equal truth that no successful writer can be an island.

Whatever you choose as the path for your project (whether that be a novel or a memoir or a feature length screenplay) at some point you will need to communicate clearly with a team of editors and publishers, designers and marketers. Even if you choose to go with the self-publishing route to bring your book to market, you will still find yourself working with a team.

Use your ghostwriting experience to hone these skills. Learn how to discuss project specs. Talk about time lines. Be clear about expectations. Discover the value of saying no.

Receiving Notes:

No one ever wants to hear that they need to go back to the drawing board. As difficult as that may is for anyone to hear though, re-writing is the soul of good writing.

Humble yourself. Take good notes while listening to your ghostwriting client. Have your own ideas to add. Most importantly though, do not take getting notes as a personal attack.

Bring what procedural feedback you get back to the table and dive into draft two. Learning how to deal with criticism (especially the bigger monster: self-criticism) is key to becoming a professional in any creative venture.

That Professional Feeling:

This may seem a little corny… but feeling like a professional goes a long way toward becoming a professional. Call yourself a ghostwriter. Imbue that definition with class.

Put your title on your business card. A professional ghostwriter carries a certain feeling about them that amateurs do not. That can go a long way toward distinguishing yourself from others vying for the same publisher or agent’s attention. At a writer’s conference, everyone is out applying for the same job. It’s a helpful boost to feel as though you’ve been there before.

Stay tuned for more another set of tips on how to use your ghostwriting practice as a path to publication in the second installment of this blog.

 

No comments
Erick MertzProfessional Ghostwriter – Ghostwriting As Path to Publication (Part I)
Read More

Tips For Writing Conference Networking

No Matter Your Writer Goals, Behavior Dictates Success

Willamette Writer's ConferenceLast weekend was the 50th Willamette Writer’s Conference in Portland, Oregon. I have attended this particular conference for going on eight years and I am consistently shocked by the way writers behave when they find themselves in confined spaces.

Some people get it. A majority do, actually. Others clearly don’t though. Four days in a hotel with your colleagues can be stressful even terror inducing. Don’t let it get to you.

Here are five tips to keep in mind before you attend your next conference.

Be Friendly

I’m always shocked at how the tried and true axiom “treat others the way you want to be treated” flies out the door in professional scenarios. It absolutely should not. These should be the moments this trait needs to come out to shine.

Talent is great. It’s enviable. People you meet have to want to work with you though. Are you acting like the kind of person who they’re going to want to call?

That impression begins the moment you walk into the conference room.

Don’t Be Over Polite

The flip side? Try and remain genuine. No one likes someone going over the top into phony. Holding doors and other obsequious behavior may get you into trouble.

Brand Yourself as Friendly & Helpful

While attending the Willamette Writer’s Conference I volunteer. Consequently, people associate me with some inner knowledge about the conference’s inner workings.

Even when my shifts are complete and I’m attending classes, people seek me out to ask questions. I don’t have to help but I do. Once again, it goes back to that age old axiom.

Don’t Get Star Struck

My father once said something very important to me when I was young and I keep it close to me now. Everyone you meet is just another person doing their job.

How I translate that in the conference scenario is, treat those agents and producers (and hotel staff pouring your drinks) like you would anyone else you encounter during your day.

That guy might be the perfect agent for your book but you know something? He’s probably thinking about the wife and dog he left at home. Or he’s just struggling to reach five o’clock.

Keep Your Mind Open

Remember your goal is connection. You may have your sights focused on signed with an agent or manager but you never know how that connection will happen.

It may not be during your assigned pitch session. Your long worked for break may come via someone you shared small talk with in a classroom.

Keep yourself open minded.

Subscribe to my blog today for more tips and pointers on the writer’s life.

Get in touch with me today for 20% off of your manuscript consultation. Just let me know how you found me in your first email!

No comments
Erick MertzTips For Writing Conference Networking
Read More

When No Doesn’t Hurt

NEVER FEAR THE NO, GHOSTWRITER

Ghostwriting, Ghostwriter, Erick MertzThere are precious few certainties in ghostwriting. Securing an assignment is (at best) a treacherous prospect, one often littered with confusion and self-doubt inducing silence.

One of the most precarious uncertainties facing a ghostwriter is the frequent lack of “no”. This is an eerie truth no one bothers to share when you go out on your own. You are going to get turned down for a lot of work that you throw your best effort at (much more than you’ll land) but learning that you’re not getting the gig by actually hearing no only happens rarely.

1 comment
Erick MertzWhen No Doesn’t Hurt
Read More

How To Lose A Ghostwriting Job (Before You Even Get It)

Working As A Ghostwriter Is Filled With Ups and Downs. Here Are Just a Few Of The Ways Your Gig Can Go Sideways.

Erick Mertz, How To Lose A Ghostwriting JobOh the ghostwriting stories I could tell. Sometimes I believe that my real breakthrough book is destined be all about the many clients I worked with throughout these years.

Almost more interesting than the books I have written, are the books I’ve almost written. Ghostwriting is a numbers game on all sides of the equation. As a writer for hire, you must cast a net and I mean cast it widely. Some prospects cross your path to get a bid too. They’re playing the numbers game too in the form of a little price shopping before they decide whether to go elsewhere. As I’ve previously written, it all adds up to a curious way to make a living.

No comments
Erick MertzHow To Lose A Ghostwriting Job (Before You Even Get It)
Read More

Five Things To Consider (When Pricing A Ghostwriting Job)

ghostwriting, ghostwriter, erick mertz, portland, oregon

Coming up with a price for ghostwriting jobs can make a writer feel like it’s back to the lawless wild west days again. Arriving at agreeable cost (and payment structure) can often serve as a breaking point between client and writer.

Arriving at a good rate doesn’t have to leave you high and dry though. If you keep a few key factors in mind you and your client can find a happy medium between affordability and getting paid adequately for your talents.

Here are five things to consider when pricing a ghostwriting job.

No comments
Erick MertzFive Things To Consider (When Pricing A Ghostwriting Job)
Read More

So You Want To Be A Ghostwriter?

Writer For Hire Ghostwriter GhostwritingA ghostwriter’s role is often curious. Maybe it’s embedded in the name. I have performed the job for more than ten years and yet I still find myself surprised by what crosses my desk.

Ghostwriting is a stranger prospect to writers than non-writers though. When I try and explain what I do to a non-writer they understand it intuitively. Try and describe to other professional writers and they glaze over with confusion.

2 comments
Erick MertzSo You Want To Be A Ghostwriter?
Read More